Converting Raw to JPEG – Adobe Photoshop

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Today we are going to learn “How to process raw files and convert them in JPEG using Adobe Photoshop”. In comparison of raw and JPEG images, I must say raw images are 10 times better than JPEG images, Because they allow you to process picture well and they contain more details than JPEG. Also you can give your desired look to a RAW image. Many photographers prefer to shoot in JPEG format so that they don’t have to spend time processing raw images to get better colors and tones within Photoshop Elements’ standard editor. Because JPEG photos are already processed in the camera, they instantly take on the colors produced by the camera’s picture style and white balance settings.

However, a lot of the color and tonal information is thrown away when you shoot in JPEG, so you can end up adding noise or blocky compression artifacts to the shot if you do need to edit it later.

Most of the famous photographers prefer to shoot photo in RAW mode. But the main problem of RAW images are they don’t show you the exact color of the object whose picture you have taken. But in your camera you can see a very fine look the photo. The color disappears only when you insert them in your PC.

There has several way to convert raw files into JPEG. But most of the time it shows a very bad result. But Adobe Photoshop CC can help you in this fact. It’s truly gives an excellent result. So today I am going to tell you how to make a better look of a RAW image using Adobe Photoshop CC. We are going to follow some steps to complete this action.

This is the RAW image which I am going to process today and convert it to JPEG image.

1

OPEN THE IMAGE IN ADOBE PHOTOSHOP CC

First you need to open the RAW image in Photoshop. To open it, click “File”. Then “Open” and select the photo. Now you can see a dialogue box appeared like the image below.

2

SET THE WHITE BALANCE

To process the photo first you need to look at the photo and its feelings. Here I am using a photo of a “street boy” and the picture is a little bit off. I took this picture in a winter morning. I want to show the situation In my photo, so its obvious that I am not going to make it warm. So I slide the temperature level to 4150 and the tint level to  -1.

3

ANALYZE THE EXPOSURE AND CONTRAST

The histogram helps you spot any exposure problems. The histogram graph fails to stretch to the far right so we can see that the shot lacks strong dark shadows. The graph’s highlights drop off before they reach the far left, too, which means that the image consists mostly of mid-tones. The shot’s contrast is a little flat. To give it more impact we need to darken the shadows and brighten the highlights. This will help us to reveal more texture and details. Drag Exposure to +0.20. This gives the shot stronger highlights.

4

DARKEN THE SHADOWS

To darken the shadows without changing other tones, drag the Shadow slider right to -13. The histogram has collapsed, because we’ve decreased the range of tones to include more highlights and shadows. Untick, then tick, the Preview box to see a before and after image.

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But here you can see some overexposed area shown in red. We need to decrease white or highlight to fix that overexposed area. So here I decreased -12 for highlights. Now the overexposed areas are almost gone.

6

INCREASE THE MID-TONE CONTRAST

The shot’s consist mostly of similar mid-tones. To help reveal more detail, drag the Clarity slider to +18. This increases the mid-tone contrast without messing with your carefully adjusted shadows and highlights.

7

INCREASE VIBRANCE

The Vibrance slider is designed to boost the saturation of weaker colors without over-saturating existing strong colors. By moving the Vibrance slider up to +25 you can boost the saturation of the without over-saturation.

8

TONE CURVE

Tone curve is very essential to give a great tone in the photo. You can give your photo to any look by changing those tone curves. Here you can see a “Straight Line” which represents the whole RGB of your photo. You can give a good looking tone using “Tone curve”. But I need to change the contrast of definite color. So click on the “RGB”. Now here its showing RED, GREEN, BLUE particularly.

Select the “RGB” and change make the curve as shown in below.

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Select the “RED” and change make the curve as shown in below.

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Now again select the “GREEN” and change make the curve as shown in below.

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Now select the “BLUE” and change make the curve as shown in below.

 

12HUE/SATURATION/LUMINANCE

Change the hue/saturation/luminance to get the perfect color. But if you add too much saturation what may appear so odd and overexposed. Here for this picture I changed a little.

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SPLIT TONING

This gives toning of mainly shadows and highlights. For this picture I changed the highlight’s hue to 71 and saturation to 9.

14

LENS CORRECTION

By this option you have a quick access to width or narrow the lens view. But for this picture I think my original lens view is pretty good. So I don’t need to correct the lens width. But I want to use a vintage effect. In spite of doing manually I can do it here.

15

CAMERA CALIBRATION

Click  “Camera profile” and it’s auto selected to “adobe standard”. You can change it to your like wise.

SAVE THE IMAGE

Now click on the “File” option at the top. Selet “Save us..” then save the file in any drive you want to. But don’t forget to change the format to “JPEG”. Then save the file.

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18So now you can see that how simply we can convert RAW files to JPEG with sufficient color adjustment.

 

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